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Canning Chicken Broth

 Canning Chicken Broth is an amazing way to preserve this delicious staple of so many homemade recipes. Homemade broth is a very simple, sustainable, and affordable process!

mason jars of chicken stock on a white surface with veggies and herbs

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So many cozy and delicious recipes start with chicken broth. A flavorful broth makes every soup, stew, or casserole taste even better. Homemade chicken broth is easy to make and is essentially made with “scraps” like leftover roasted chicken and veggie peels.

I love to have a mix of both frozen and shelf-stable broth on hand. Read on to learn how to safely can or freeze your delicious homemade stock.

If you want to can your broth it must be processed in a pressure canner. You cannot safely process any meat products in a water bath canner. If you’re not comfortable using a pressure canner, you can freeze your broth in a variety of ways.

Can You Freeze Chicken Broth?

Yes, you sure can! If you want to freeze in canning jars, you’ll need to use wide-mouth (not regular mouth) jars. Leave 1-inch of space between the top of the broth and the top of the jar so that it can expand while it freezes. Do not place the jars in the freezer until the broth/stock has completely cooled.

I also love these Souper Cubes for freezing liquids. You can freeze in batches and then remove the cubes and store them in freezer-safe bags. The frozen chicken broth will last for 6-12 months in the freezer if stored properly.

If you freeze in canning jars, allow the jar to defrost overnight in the fridge or for a few hours at room temperature. Do not attempt to thaw the frozen jars in the microwave or in hot water as it could cause the glass to crack.

Chicken Broth CANNING SUPPLIES

Check out this in-depth post for a complete list of canning supplies.

You’ll need:

  • Hot chicken broth, fat skimmed
  • Pressure Canner
  • Canning funnel
  • Pint or quart canning jars (thrift stores are my favorite sources for these!)
  • New lids and clean rings
  • Jar lifter
  • Plastic chopstick or another long plastic utensil
  • Clean thick towel to place the hot jars on

How to Make Chicken Stock

I’ll walk you through it really quickly here, but if you want in-depth instructions with lots of photos on how to make it in an Instant Pot or a slow cooker, check out this post on How to Make Chicken Bone Broth.

Place the chicken, veggie scraps, apple cider vinegar, and herbs in a large stockpot. Cover with water and place a lid on the stockpot. Cook on low for 6-12 hours. Your house is going to smell amazing while this simmers!

Place a strainer/colander in your largest mixing bowl. Carefully pour the stock into the strainer (you may need to do half at a time depending on the size of your bowl and strainer) and allow the stock to drain into the bowl.
 
Optional: Once the stock has finished draining, place a fine-mesh strainer over another bowl and pour the stock through the sieve. This helps remove all the herbs, and greatly reduces the fat you’ll need to skim. 
 
From here, you can skim the fat from the hot broth using a spoon or a fat separator. I find both of those tactics to be a bit labor-intensive. Instead, I prefer to refrigerate the stock overnight and skim the solid fat in the morning. If you use this method, you must reheat the stock before canning it.

How to Can Chicken Broth

I’ll walk you through the process here with photos, and you’ll also find a printable version with detailed measurements in the recipe card at the bottom of this post.

Wash and clean your jars. For canning bone broth, I recommend quart-sized regular mouth jars. It is no longer necessary to sterilize jars before canning (hurray!) but you should make sure they are preheated enough to not crack when placed in hot water.

You can put them in a clean dishwasher and run them through a quick wash cycle, or place them in a large pan with some water in a low heat oven (my lowest temp is 170F degrees) until you need them. I’ve even just put hot tap water in them before and left them on the counter.

Wash your lids with hot soapy water and place them in a clean bowl for now.

Add 3 quarts of water to your canner and put it on a burner set to high. Make sure there is a canning rack in the bottom of the canner. 

Place a funnel on a canning jar, and ladle in the hot broth, leaving 1 inch of headspace. Headspace is defined as the space between the top of the food and the top of the jar.

Remove any bubbles from the jar (I use a plastic chopstick). Use a wet clean rag and wipe the rim of the jars to make sure they are free of any food.

Place a clean lid and then a ring on the jar and tighten the ring to fingertip tight (tight enough that it won’t come off in the canner, but not so tight that Thor couldn’t budge it).

3 photos showing step by step how to can chicken stock

Using canning tongs, carefully lower the jars into the canner. Lock the lid. Soon, steam will start coming through the vent pipe (I call it the steam chimney). Allow the steam to pass through for about 10 minutes. Then put the pressure regulator (I call it the chimney cap) on top.

Pretty soon, the air vent will pop up. That is a sign that you’re starting to build pressure inside the canner.

pressure canner prep steps for pressure canning

Under normal conditions, chicken broth needs to be pressure canned at 11 pounds of pressure for 20 minutes for pints and 25 minutes for quarts. See chart below for any changes to processing times.

processing times for canning chicken stock

When the dial gauge reaches 11 pounds of pressure, reduce the burner temp to medium, and start your timer. The pressure must stay at 11 or (a little bit) above for the entire time. You’ll also likely need to adjust the temp on the burner a few times depending on your stove.

When the time is up, remove the canner from the burner and allow it to sit until you hear a distinctive “click” of the air vent dropping. Remove the pressure regulator and carefully remove the lid (Pro tip: I always use oven mitts when I take the lid off because the steam is super hot).

Let the jars sit for 5 minutes in the canner and then lift them out with canning tongs. Place jars on a towel where they can sit undisturbed for 12 hours.

After a few hours, to check for sealing, gently press down in the middle of the lid. If the lid has no give, it’s sealed. If you can press the lid in and it pops a bit, your jars are not sealed. You can reprocess them or store them in the fridge or freezer (only freeze jars that are wide mouth).

Store in a cool dry place for up to 12 months.

tongs lifting a mason jar of chicken stock out of a canner

More Pressure Canning Recipes

Canning Chicken Broth

Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time6 hrs
Total Time6 hrs 15 mins
Homemade broth is a very simple, sustainable, and affordable process!

Ingredients

Instructions

Make The Chicken Broth

  • Place the chicken, veggie scraps, apple cider vinegar, and herbs in a large stockpot.
  • Cover with water and place a lid on the stockpot. Cook on low for 6-12 hours.
  • Place a strainer/colander in a large mixing bowl.
  • Carefully pour the stock into the strainer and allow the stock to drain into the bowl.
  • Optional: Once the stock has finished draining, place a fine-mesh strainer over another bowl and pour the stock through the sieve.
  • Skim any fat off the broth.

How to Can Chicken Broth

  • Wash and sanitize your jars. You’ll want to keep them warm to avoid having them crack when placed in the canner. You can fill them with hot water, or place them on a tray in the oven at 170 degrees F.
  • Wash your lids with hot soapy water and place them in a clean bowl for now.
  • Add 3 quarts of water to your canner and put it on a burner set to high. Make sure there is a canning rack in the bottom of the canner. 
  • Place a funnel on a canning jar, and ladle in the hot broth, leaving 1 inch of headspace. 
  • Remove the bubbles from the jar (I use a plastic chopstick).
  • Use a wet clean rag and wipe the rim of the jars to make sure it is free of any food.
  • Place a clean lid and ring on the jar and tighten the ring to fingertip tight.
  • Using canning tongs, gently place the jars in the canner. Lock the lid. Soon, steam will start coming through the vent pipe.
  • Allow the steam to pass through for about 10 minutes. Then put the pressure regulator on top. (see photos in post above to see this in action)
  • Under normal conditions, chicken broth needs to be pressure canned at 11 pounds of pressure for 20 minutes for pints and 25 minutes for quarts. See the chart in the post above for altitude-based changes to processing times.
  • When the dial gauge reaches 11 pounds of pressure, reduce the burner temp to medium, and start your timer. The pressure must stay at 11 or (a little bit) above for the entire time.
  • When the time is up, remove the canner from the burner and allow it to sit until you hear a distinctive “click” of the air vent dropping.
  • Remove the pressure regulator and carefully remove the lid (Pro tip: I always use oven mitts when I take the lid off because the steam is super hot).
  • Let the jars sit for 5 minutes in the canner and then lift them out with canning tongs. Place on a towel where they can sit undisturbed for 12 hours.
  • After a few hours, to check for sealing, gently press down in the middle of the lid. If the lid has no give, it’s sealed. If you can press the lid in and it pops a bit, your jars are not sealed.

Notes

Store in a cool dark place for up to 12 months.
 
Prior to canning, you can skim the fat from the hot broth using a spoon or a fat separator. I find both of those tactics to be a bit labor-intensive. Instead, I prefer to refrigerate the stock overnight and skim the solid fat in the morning. If you use this method, you must reheat the stock before canning it.
Nutrition Facts
Canning Chicken Broth
Amount Per Serving (2 cups)
Calories 37 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Cholesterol 1mg0%
Sodium 36mg2%
Potassium 124mg4%
Carbohydrates 8g3%
Fiber 2g8%
Sugar 1g1%
Protein 2g4%
Vitamin A 2890IU58%
Vitamin C 6mg7%
Calcium 21mg2%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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