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Turkey Bone Broth

Homemade Turkey Bone Broth is an amazing way to use up every last bit of your turkey.
3 jars of turkey bone broth with veggies and herbs

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Homemade Turkey Bone Broth is an amazing way to use up every last bit of your roasted turkey. Learning how to make turkey stock is a very simple, sustainable, and affordable process! This recipe includes tips for freezing your delicious stock.

3 jars of turkey bone broth with veggies and herbs

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Everyone knows that the best part of making an amazing turkey dinner is the delicious and nourishing bone broth you can make from leftovers. Because let’s face it…turkey on its own is kinda boring.

Use the meat for Turkey Shepherd’s Pie (which also uses up leftover Fluffy Mashed Potatoes), but the rest of the turkey is about to be transformed into an incredible homemade turkey bone broth. 

Made by you. Like you’re Martha freaking-Stewart or something.

Oh, and if you don’t want to freeze your awesome homemade turkey stock, you can actually can it! Follow the steps and instructions in this post on Canning Chicken Broth. The processing time is the same for turkey.

Can I Make It in the Instant Pot?

Yes, but you’d have to have a large Instant Pot and a very small turkey (or you’ll need to break down the turkey carcass). If those two things are happening, add everything to the Instant Pot insert.

Fill with water to the “max fill” line. Flip the steam release handle to “sealing”. Press manual>high pressure>120 minutes. When it has finished cooking allow it to do a natural release. Given the volume of the liquid in the pot, it may take 30-60 minutes to fully depressurize.

Any questions about this process? Check out this post on Instant Pot for beginners for all the tips and tricks on using your Instant Pot.

turkey and vegetables in a stockpot

While doing my weekly Prep Once, Cook Twice meal prep, I’m often chopping and prepping veggies for multiple dishes. When peeling carrots, chopping onions, or other veg, I save the “scraps” in freezer bags (I love these reusable silicone ones) for making stock.

Using all the scraps is why my husband hilariously calls bone broth “garbage water”. It is literally the parts of everything that were destined for the trash.

turkey stock in a pot with canning jars on a white board

Pro Tips/Recipe Notes

  • Bone broth that is cooked at too high of a temperature may produce foam on the top. You can skim that off and discard it to produce a deeper and cleaner stock.
  • The fat that you skim off the cooled bone broth can be used for cooking or roasting veggies. You can also discard it.
  • Store for up to five days in the fridge or six months in the freezer.
3 jars of turkey bone broth with veggies and herbs
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Turkey Bone Broth

Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time12 hrs
Total Time12 hrs 5 mins
Homemade Turkey Bone Broth is an amazing way to use up every last bit of your turkey.

Ingredients

  • 1 turkey carcass
  • 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp black peppercorns
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 5 cups veggie scraps carrots, onions, and celery (5 cups total, not of each veggie)
  • water to cover

Instructions

Stovetop Instructions

  • Place all ingredients in the largest stockpot you have. You may need to break down the carcass to get everything to fit. Add herbs and veggies.
    1 turkey carcass, 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar, 1 tsp black peppercorns, 3 bay leaves, 5 cups veggie scraps carrots, onions, and celery
  • Slowly add water until it reaches about 2 inches from the top of your pot. Pro tip: the amount of water will vary depending on the size of your stockpot.
    water to cover
  • Bring it to a boil for 1 minute and then and immediately reduce to a simmer. Cover with the lid, but set it slightly ajar.
  • Allow the bone broth to simmer on low for 12 to 24 hours.
  • Strain the bone broth through a colander.
  • Fill jars or storage containers.

Instant Pot Instructions

  • Add everything to the Instant Pot insert.
  • Fill with water to the “max fill” line. Flip the steam release handle to “sealing”.
  • Press manual>high pressure>120 minutes
  • When it has finished cooking allow it to do a natural release. Given the volume of the liquid in the pot, it may take 30-60 minutes to fully depressurize.
  • Follow instructions 5-6 in the stovetop instructions.

Slow Cooker Instructions

  • Place all ingredients in your slow cooker. You may need to break down the carcass to get everything to fit. Add herbs and veggies.
  • Slowly add water until it reaches about 2 inches from the top of your crock. Pro tip: the amount of water will vary depending on the size of your slow cooker.
  • Cover with the lid and cook on low for 12-18 hours.
  • Follow instructions 5-6 in the stovetop instructions.

Notes

If you are going to freeze the broth, use only wide-mouth canning jars and leave 1 inch of headspace to allow for the liquid to expand while it freezes. To prevent cracking, make sure the broth has fully cooled before placing it in the freezer.
 
Store for up to five days in the fridge or six months in the freezer.
Nutrition Facts
Turkey Bone Broth
Amount Per Serving (1 cup)
Calories 50 Calories from Fat 5
% Daily Value*
Fat 0.5g1%
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 90mg4%
Carbohydrates 1g0%
Sugar 0g0%
Protein 10g20%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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6 comments on “Turkey Bone Broth”

  1. Question: won’t the glass jars break in the freezer? Can you use freezer bags?

    • As long as you use wide-mouth jars and leave 1 inch of space at the top of the broth, they won’t break. Don’t put them (still) frozen in hot water or the microwave and they’ll be great.

      Yes, you can use freezer bags if that’s what you prefer. Or other freezer containers, etc.

  2. So totally *ALWAYS* cook down the carcass (I don’t like that word) of even bone-in chicken breasts after dinner; or, more typically, the next day. I add the usually wilted carrots from the crisper and a handful of whatever herbs are about-ready-to-wilt and simmer for a little while with water and S&P, then strain. The stock may not be as beautiful as your bone broth, but it is part of my Everlasting Meal philosophy. 

  3. For years, I’ve put the turkey bones (along with veggies and herbs I put inside the turkey while it roasts) in my biggest stock pot right after the Thanksgiving dishes are done, and simmered it for hours. By the next morning, I have the stock for Italian Wedding Soup, which I serve at Christmas. I love your idea of saving scraps to add to the stock pot.