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How to Make Brown Sugar {Homemade Brown Sugar}

Learn how to make brown sugar in under five minutes, with only two ingredients. Make this brown sugar recipe at home, and never run out of this crucial baking ingredient again. 

homemade brown sugar in a glass bowl with a spoon

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Homemade brown sugar is so much easier and cheaper to make than you think. Make it at home and impress your friends! Or at the very least, you’ll impress yourself.

First things first, this recipe is EASY. And so simple to adapt to meet your baking needs. It’s totally fine to experiment with measurements to make it how you like it. You can’t break this recipe!

We go through a lot of brown sugar because they are a key ingredient in something I make a lot – my recipe for The Softest Whole Wheat Chocolate Chip Cookies. It’s also amazing in these Fudgy Gluten Free Chocolate Brownies and of course, Overnight Cinnamon Rolls.

What Ingredients Are in Homemade Brown Sugar?

Yep, that’s it!

a bottle of molasses, a jar of sugar, and a bowl of homemade brown sugar

The best kind of sugar is what you have on hand! Muscovado and coconut sugar already have that brown sugar flavor, so will need just a touch of molasses to really get it to that brown sugar level. If you want to use an alternative sweetener like Splenda or monkfruit, follow the same measurements as regular sugar.

What kind of Molasses Should I Use to Make Brown Sugar?

Light molasses is the result of the first processing of sugar cane and will result in a lighter sugar. You may need to use a bit more to get the sugar exactly how you’d like it.

Dark molasses happens after the second processing of sugar cane and is a great “medium” molasses to use in this recipe. And lastly, blackstrap molasses is produced after the third boiling of the sugar. It’s bitter but also has the highest health properties.

I prefer to use blackstrap molasses because it is high in iron. You can feel “good” about eating a chocolate chip cookie when it adds delicious iron to your diet. Right?

How Do You Make Brown Sugar Without Molasses?

If molasses isn’t something you can get your hands on, treacle will also work. Treacle is not a common ingredient in the states, so my US readers will probably only know of it from Harry Potter. 🙂

organic sugar and molasses in a mixer bowl

homemade brown sugar on a kitchen aid mixer paddle attachment

Pro Tips/Recipe Notes

  • It lasts as long as storebought will before getting hard.
  • If you need to soften up some cakey brown sugar, place a few slices of apple in the jar and wait an hour. A soft piece of bread works as well.
  • If you don’t have a stand mixer, you can use a hand mixer, food processor (though only on the pulse function or you’ll end up with powdered sugar!), or even two forks or a pastry cutter and a lot of patience.

a bowl of homemade brown sugar in front of a black background

MORE RECIPES LIKE THIS

homemade brown sugar in a glass bowl with a spoon
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5 from 10 votes

Homemade Brown Sugar

Prep Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Learn how to make brown sugar in under five minutes, with only two ingredients.

Ingredients

Equipment

Instructions

  • Combine ingredients in a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment.
  • Mix on low for two minutes, scrape the sides, and mix for another two minutes.
  • Transfer to an air-tight container and store just as you would normal brown sugar.

Notes

The recipe above is for medium brown sugar. 
Light brown sugar - 1 cup of sugar to 2 1/2 tsp of molasses
Dark brown sugar - 1 cup of sugar to 1 1/2 tbsp of molasses
You can also mix by hand with a fork, but be prepared for some amazing arm muscles by the end of it!
Nutrition Facts
Homemade Brown Sugar
Amount Per Serving (1 tsp)
Calories 17 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Sodium 1mg0%
Potassium 5mg0%
Carbohydrates 4g1%
Sugar 4g4%
Calcium 1mg0%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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28 comments on “How to Make Brown Sugar {Homemade Brown Sugar}”

  1. Do you make your own sugar for the cane juice? Do you have a post about that?

  2. If you don’t use organic sugar is the molasses amount going to be the same for reg sugar?

  3. Is the molasses amounts also good if you don’t use organic with sugar?

  4. If your homemade brown sugar is $1.22 a pound and the organic brown sugar (on sale) is $6.50 for 2 pounds then you are saving significantly more than 40 cents. The store price is $3.25 a pound so you are saving over $2. I think that makes this a great deal.
    I usually just add the molasses into the recipe but this would be perfect for things like oatmeal where we’d like to have brown sugar. Also, I didn’t know that Costco carried evap cane juice – can’t wait to pick some up my next trip.

  5. I didn’t know you could do this? Pretty neat.5 stars

  6. OMG – DH has Dark Brown Sugar on the list, Organic Brown Sugar is cheaper than Dark Brown Organic Brown Sugar, do you think I even though to add more molases? I have tons of that lying around (my Oma used Molases never sugar or Honey so I grew up with it in barrels).5 stars

  7. I would try adding a few tsp per cup and test it out to see how you like it. I always try to keep in mind when I’m cooking you can always add more, but it’s hard to fix it if you add TOO much! Try around with it, and see how you like it. ;-D

    Sarah

  8. I usually just add the white sugar to the mixer when I’m baking, and add the molasses separately. It still tastes like brown sugar, and then I don’t have to worry about making it.

    Also, mini-rant: apparently most brown sugars are made that way these days. It used to be that brown sugar was less refined, but now they are usually “painted sugars”.5 stars

  9. I did this one time to make some chocolate chip cookies and I must’ve used too much molasses, because they tasted a lot like gingerbread crossed with chocolate chip cookies! It is good to know how to substitute with ingredients you have on hand!